Yorkiepoo Care

The Yorkiepoo--a cross of the Yorkshire Terrier and the Toy or Miniature Poodle--is a small, lively hybrid that's beloved by designer dog owners around the globe. And fortunately for them, Yorkiepoo care isn't too time-consuming overall. This page has plenty of info on how to care for a Yorkiepoo: puppy development, exercise needs, diet and nutrition, and much more. For all Yorkiepoo information and care, read on!

Yorkiepoo Breed Development

Yorkiepoo puppy development from birth to adulthood typically spans 11-12 months. Physically, these dogs are tiny when born (most are less than a pound in weight), and puppies grow fairly steadily before reaching their full adult size at 10-11 months of age. (And depending of the size of the parent dogs, Yorkiepoos can range in size from four to 12 pounds.) Socially, puppies develop steadily as well: they reach adolescence at about three months, sexual maturity at 7-8 months, and full mental maturity by a year of age (though some may retain their puppylike behavior for up to an additional year). For specific developmental milestones see the following chart:

Yorkiepoo Exercise Needs

Like all dogs, the Yorkiepoo needs consistent exercise in order to remain healthy and happy--but since these little dogs are extremely lively and energetic in the first place, their physical activity requirements aren't as high as many other breeds. Though this amount may vary depending on the dog's age, the typical adult Yorkiepoo will need about 45 minutes of exercise each day. You can start exercising your Yorkiepoo puppy as early as two months of age by taking in on short (5- to 10-minute) walks, then increasing the walks' duration as the puppy grows.

Some things to consider when exercising a Yorkiepoo: first, puppies younger than six months old shouldn't participate in activities that include lots of jumping and running, as doing so can injure their still-developing bones and joints. And even full-grown, a Yorkiepoo is still quite small, so rough horseplay should be avoided in general. This small size is also a concern when in public: for one thing, Yorkiepoos are very confident (they're often called "large dogs in small dogs' bodies"); this boldness can be a problem if a Yorkiepoo confronts a truly large dog in a park or somewhere similar--the Yorkiepoo will not realize it's a five-pound dog attacking a 100-pound one! On the flip side, these tiny dogs can be considered prey by larger, aggressive dogs or other predators. All this to say that it's highly recommended that owners keep their Yorkiepoos leashed when exercising them in public.

But by all means, make sure your Yorkiepoo get some physical activity every single day. An under-exercised Yorkiepoo will become a nightmare: it'll turn destructive and disobedient...and since they're yappy dogs already, a Yorkiepoo that's bored or restless will likely bark 24/7. Here are some exercise ideas:

  • Walking: Two 15-minute walks per day is a good target
  • Fetch: Can be played indoors or out
  • Blowing Bubbles: Use commercial bubble solution; your Yorkiepoo will enjoy "attacking" them
  • Hide-and-Seek: Give the dog a treat when it finds you
  • Canine Sports: Yorkiepoos excel in agility and flyball competitions


When indoors, it's a good idea to give a Yorkiepoo access to one or more balls or chew toys so it can burn off pent-up energy (which it'll undoubtedly have plenty of). It's also recommended that you set a consistent daily exercise schedule for the dog, such as walks after breakfast and dinner and a play period in the afternoon.

Yorkiepoo Maintenance

Maintenance for these dogs in terms of shedding and drooling is very low compared to most breeds. Yorkiepoo shedding is extremely low, and they hardly drool at all.

Yorkiepoos have soft, wavy coats that are considered hypoallergenic--which actually means they produce little or no dander, the shed skin flakes that trigger allergic reactions in humans. So does a Yorkiepoo shed at all? The answer is yes--every dog does, at least a little. But the amount of shed hairs from these dogs is extremely small, so owners won't need to worry about cleaning up stray hairs.

And a Yorkiepoo may drool a tiny bit in anticipation of food, but none otherwise. If your Yorkiepoo is drooling excessively, it may be a sign of a medical issue, in which case you should consult a veterinarian.

Yorkiepoo Diet

Yorkiepoo diet and nutrition, as with all breeds, is of utmost importance to these little dogs' health and longevity. As a toy-sized breed, these dogs have a high metabolism--plus they're naturally lively, so they'll need a lot of nutrition packed into the food they eat. A majority of owners say the most sensible Yorkiepoo food is premium dry kibble; high-quality foods have the necessary proteins and carbohydrates that cheap dog foods just don't. The problem is, owners say, Yorkiepoos can be very picky eaters! Numerous owners attest to trying several different brands (and even then, having to mix in a bit of canned food with the kibble) before finding a food that their Yorkiepoo will enjoy.

But as you can imagine, a Yorkiepoo doesn't eat much of food it even loves. Though these amounts can vary based on the dog's age and activity level, a typical adult Yorkiepoo will need about ¾ cup of dry food per day, divided into three meals. (Small breeds like this one can often suffer from hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, if they don't eat more regularly than larger breeds.) Depending on their age, puppies will need slightly less: about ½ cup per day, divided into four meals until six months of age. See this feeding chart for more info:

Obesity can be an issue with this breed (as it can with all dogs), but Yorkiepoos are not as prone to it as some other breeds are. Two ways to prevent obesity in your Yorkiepoo: first, make sure you stick to the above-listed portions. Sure, the amounts seem tiny--but so is your dog! And it's a good idea to have a consistent daily feeding schedule for the dog so it can get used to eating at the same time every day. Second: veterinarians strongly warn against "free-feeding" any dog, whereby food is left in its bowl all the time so the dog can eat anytime it wants. It's better to put your Yorkiepoo's food dish down only at mealtime, then pick it up 15 minutes or so after the dog begins eating.If you're worried your Yorkiepoo is overweight, give it this simple Ribs Test: run a hand along its side, and if you can't feel any ribs, it's diet time. Decrease the dog's daily food consumption by one-fourth, and add an extra walk or play period to its daily exercise schedule.